Beaulieu Vineyards Reserve Tapestry 2009 Napa Valley

TalesoftheCork Wine Reviews

Beaulieu Vineyard Reserve Tapestry 2009 Napa Valley

For those of you whose pocketbook will not allow them to purchase the Aug. 17, 2013, Wine Spectator Daily Pick: Beaulieu Vineyard Maestro Collection Ranch No. 1 Rutherford 2009 for $65, I recommend a 91-point BV wine that still should satisfy even discriminating tastes for just over half the cost.

Since 1900, the Latour family has been farming the Napa Valley and helping create and add to its beauty. Since then the BV vineyards, vines and wines have been a part of the backbone of Napa Valley and Rutherford, California’s, history.

Beaulieu Vineyard Reserve Tapestry is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Malbec. Its dark red fruit, flowers, licorice are some of the notes that emerge from this sleek, beautifully balanced red.
Beaulieu Vineyard Reserve Tapestry is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Malbec. Its dark red fruit, flowers, licorice are some of the notes that emerge from this sleek, beautifully balanced red.

Beaulieu Vineyard Reserve Tapestry Napa Valley 09 is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Malbec. Winemaker Jeffrey Stambor chose blocks of reserve-quality grapes which combine to create a wine that has soft tannins and is approachable/drinkable now.

The fruit is deep, dark and red–even jammy. First tastes are cassis and blackberry but give way to licorice, black cherry, plum and a hint of chocolate. There is a light minerality, spice, herb and earthiness to the blend while the floral notes slightly increase after opening.

Robert Parker in The Wine Advocate called the BV Reserve Tapestry 2009 “… A beautifully balanced red.” The Wine Spectator referred to the bottle as “Graceful, with complex spice, herb, dried currant and crushed rock flavors that are well-proportioned and gaining on the finish, where the flavors weave together with subtle nuances.”

While the suggested food pairing includes semi-hard cheeses like Bravo white cheddar, meat dishes, duck and mushroom dishes, I enjoyed my 2009 Beaulieu Vineyard Reserve Tapestry with a mesquite charcoal-grilled ribeye steak with a pomegranate red wine reduction sauce. The side dish was mozzarella, baby Roma tomatoes and basil fresh from the local farmer’s market mixed with vinegar and white balsamic. The Cabernet blend mixed well with the lightly braised tomatoes and complimented the peppery and smoky flavors of the meat. We used a fresh baked batard to sop up the juices.

While not BV's top Cabernet or blend, the Beaulieu Vineyard Tapestry Reserve paired well with my ribeye steak. I recommend this 90-91 point wine and a value buy drinking well now.
While not BV’s top Cabernet or blend, the Beaulieu Vineyard Tapestry Reserve paired well with my ribeye steak. I recommend this 90-91 point wine and a value buy drinking well now.

The BV Tapestry is definitely a Bordeaux-style wine built with a California palate in mind. While previous years and their estate Cabernet’s may have more finesse and complexity, this red blend will be a crowd pleaser. The finish is long, fleshy and friendly. I believe this wine will continue to improve over the next three years. This may be the Cabernet you buy six or 12 bottles to open over time.

The BV Tapestry blend is 76% Cabernet Sauvignon, 12% Merlot, 6% Cabernet Franc, 5% Petit Verdot, 1% Malbec (Alcohol by volume: 14.8%). Drink now through 2017.

Currently this wine can be bought online through various outlets, including Beaulieu Vineyard Wines and WineChateau.com ($39.97). If you are willing to buy a case of this or mix and match wine, the shipping is free through WineChateau! Another excellent source to find a competitive pricing for wine is at Wine-Searcher.com.

The average price for this wine currently is $42 (excluding tax) and available for as low as $33 on the East Coast and $36 on the West Coast. Sample received courtesy Wine Chateau for review purposes.

The Beaulieu Vineyard visitor center is located at 1960 St. Helena Hwy. Rutherford, CA 94573. Call 800.264.6918, ext. 5233, or 707.967.5233 for more information. The tasting room also has wines that are not available anywhere else. The winery is also on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/bvwines and Twitter at @BVwines.

If you missed my last post, check out the, J. Rickards Winery: Darn fine barn wine (VIDEO).

Be sure to return check out my Twitter @TalesoftheCork and on my Instagram (talesofthecork) daily postings. I also would covet those who would suggest a wine, restaurant, chef or hotel to visit. Feel free to contact me through social media or via email at talesofthecork@gmail.com.

J. Rickards Winery: Darn fine barn wine (VIDEO)

I spent three days in Sonoma County in July and, on a tip from David Scheidt, was privileged to meet Jim Rickards at his Alexander Valley tasting room in Cloverdale, CA. My premise for the trip was to taste first-rate California Rosés and J. Rickards Winery made the list.

The J. Rickards 2012 Bistro Table Rosé is perfect for the European palate, with fragrant rose petal, strawberry, watermelon in a crisp, dry finish.
The J. Rickards 2012 Bistro Table Rosé is perfect for the European palate, with fragrant rose petal, strawberry, watermelon in a crisp, dry finish.

With the summer in full swing, I wanted to begin with J. Rickards aperitif-style Rosé; it was dry and rosy-pink. Perfect for the European palate, the slightly fruity wine is a sure “patio pounder.” The 2012 Bistro Table Rosé opens with fragrant rose petal and strawberry on the nose with a burst of watermelon and crisp, dry finish. The complex taste lingers and is versatile with food or by itself at poolside. Try this blend of 60% Aleatico, 40% Syrah (100 cases, $20).

Just off of California Highway 101 north of Geyserville near Silver Oak Cellars in Sonoma County, the family-run operation of both wine grape farming and wine production is owned and operated by Jim and Eliza Rickards. They planted the vineyards starting in 1976, augmenting the original 1908 Old Vine Zinfandel block planted using horse technology.

When Jim left the military in 1969 with his military cut and large mustache, his dream was to work and own a winery.

“I wasn’t born into the wine business,” Jim said. I didn’t get it for nothing. I have worked my whole life for it.”

Hand-crafting small lot wines since 1991, Jim Rickards goal is to showcase the diverse soils and micro-climates of his vineyards. He has pioneered environmentally sensitive vineyard practices and been a proponent of sustainable farming techniques.
Hand-crafting small lot wines since 1991, Jim Rickards goal is to showcase the diverse soils and micro-climates of his vineyards. He has pioneered environmentally sensitive vineyard practices and been a proponent of sustainable farming techniques.

As their property had been in disuse and very little left from the original land owners, except the 105-year-old vines of Old Zinfandel planted by the Brignole family, the Rickards had years of development ahead of them.

In fact, the dream was so strong, they passionately recreated the early 20th century winery. He was told there was no water on the 60-acre ranch and that the best land use would be a rock quarry. Today, there are two wells and two large ponds providing water for all irrigation. Jim revived the original Zinfandel vineyard, adding new Zinfandel vines and later added Cabernet and Syrah, grafting much of their new stock. Born out of the encouragement of friends who have enjoyed the small lots of hand-crafted wine, the couple has been making wine since 1991.

As Jim began to share his passion for his wines, it became evident he was gifting me a personal history of his love for hand-crafted wines. His story includes pioneering environmentally sensitive vineyard practices and a long-time proponent of sustainable farming techniques. He spoke of losing 20 acres of vines in the late 80s-early 90s and replacing them with new disease resistant root stock. Jim’s tale includes nearly losing the farm to now growing 150 tons of grapes per year on his 45 acres.

J. Rickards Winery planned use of flowers, grasses, bird boxes and rainwater collection all add to the Jim's phrase whenever a visitor arrives at the tasting room: "Welcome to my house."
J. Rickards Winery planned use of flowers, grasses, bird boxes and rainwater collection all add to Jim’s phrase whenever a visitor arrives: “Welcome to my house.”

Land stewardship is extremely important to Jim. The planting and mulching of wild flowers and grasses and the planned introduction of environmentally friendly insects all help to create pesticides free vineyards for 20 years. He builds bird boxes which have attracted songbirds like the Western Bluebird and Tree Swallow. His use of manures and composts help add minerals and beneficial bacteria to the vineyards. From collecting rain water to the building materials his home and tasting room are made of, Jim has created a winery which is sustainable and suitable for the land he farms.

While J. Rickards is Jim and Eliza’s dream, they raised two daughters and a son who do not carry their parents’ passion into their adulthood. This Sonoma County winery remains under the zeal and spirited direction of Jim who almost always addresses his visitors with “Welcome to my house.” Jim’s warm, inviting personality soon wins over those who visit the tasting room to try some of his 15 varieties of wine. He truly has lived out the phrase, “Friends are the family you get to choose yourself,” welcoming folks from all over into his circle.

The Old Vine Zinfandel, Estate, planted in 1908 from the Brignole Vineyard, is flush with Blackberry and plum. The Ancestor Selections Zinfandel, Estate, is a prime example of the Alexander Valley with black cherry, raspberry and pepper.
The Old Vine Zinfandel, Estate, planted in 1908 from the Brignole Vineyard, is flush with Blackberry and plum. The Ancestor Selections Zinfandel, Estate, is a prime example of the Alexander Valley with black cherry, raspberry and pepper.

While I tasted through much of his wines, I do want to recommend visitors taste side by side the Ancestor Selections Zinfandel, Estate and the Old Vine Zinfandel, Estate. I loved the elegance of the 2009 Ancestor Zin. The ripe black cherry, raspberry and spicy pepper were balanced and smooth (658 cases, $24).

Yet I am old school. I preferred the rich, old-world full-bodied “field blend” of the 2010 Zinfandel, Old Vine. The boysenberry, plum and gingerbread were gorgeous. The mocha and juiciness lingered. Jim blended 80% Zinfandel, 10% Petit Syrah, 5% Carignane, 4% Mataro and 1% of Alicante Bouschet (515 cases, $25). This is a must-buy for those not yet familiar with J. Rickards.

I appreciated Jim sharing how he hand-crafts his wines while pioneering environmentally sensitive vineyard practices and sustainable farming techniques. Yet despite all the accolades his wines have earned, Jim is passionate, not pretentious, allowing the wine to speak for itself.

J. Rickards dry Bistro Table Rosé with smoked salmon salad. Wow! Great combo!
J. Rickards dry Bistro Table Rosé with smoked salmon salad. This is a full-bodied wine that is great for almost any patio meal.

Before this gets too long, I also want to recommend J. Rickards 2010 Cabernet Sauvignon, Five Sisters Blend. It is fruit forward but made in the Bordeax-style. He smiles and calls it an $80 Cab in a $34 dress (322 cases).

Finally, the 2012 Sauvignon Blanc, Croft Vineyard is a Gold Medal winner at the 2013 North Coast Wine Challenge. I could smell and taste grapefruit, white peach, floral aromas, leading to fig and melon. This is great for summer lighter fare as well as richer foods like roasted chicken (1150 cases, $19).

With over 450 Sonoma County wineries, including J. Rickards, be sure to visit as there is sure to be wine to fit all tastes, pocketbook and pairing options.

For a short VIDEO introducing J. Rickards Winery and 2012 grapes, check out Wine Oh TV’s

Wine Oh TV’s Monique Soltani as she interviews Jim Rickards.

For more information on J. Rickards Winery, visit them online at http://www.jrwinery.com or call: 707.758.3441. They can also be reached via email: jim@jrwinery.com or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/J.Rickards.Winery. J. Rickards Winery is on 24505 Chianti Road, Cloverdale, CA, 95425.

If you missed my last post, check out the South African Mulderbosch Rosé delivers superb summer value.

Be sure to return check out my Twitter @TalesoftheCork and on my Instagram (talesofthecork) daily postings. I also would covet those who would suggest a wine, restaurant, chef or hotel to visit. Feel free to contact me through social media or via email at talesofthecork@gmail.com.

Branding Le P’tit Paysan as a fresh, friendly Rosé

TalesoftheCork Wine Reviews

Ian Brand continues to produce top shelf wines in Monterey, San Benito Counties

While a personal family crisis has shuttered much of my creativity this summer, it did not prevent me from seeking out and purchasing great Rosé bottles to drink poolside or enjoy with summer, backyard cuisine.

Today’s weekend wine choice for a hot August day was suggested by Fresno’s Stan Kato of The Grape Tray. In fact, Tim Fish of Wine Spectator mentioned the bottle in his July 22, 2013, 17 Pinks from California, article.

Ian Brand moved and is raising his young family in Monterey County to work its challenging vineyards, including the Spur Ranch Vineyard in San Benito County.
Ian Brand moved and is raising his young family in Monterey County to work the challenging vineyards, including the Spur Ranch Vineyard in San Benito County.

I’ll often shop at The Grape Tray because Stan takes the time to learn the taste preferences of both his Internet and local regulars and will alert me to bottles that may be of interest. So this week, instead of just picking up an old standby French Rosé to enjoy while I soaked in the pool, I purchased a bottle of Le P’Tit Paysan. Stan said why purchase another French when a California pink would “knock my socks off.”

And he was right. But I would add, “Ian Brand knocked my socks off.”

Normally, the epicenter of a good Rosé is found in the South of France; however, increasingly quality pink wines are found coming from growers and vintners of central California. Personally, I love the smell and taste of watermelon and strawberry and historically wines with a higher percentage of Grenache, Syrah or Mourvedre produce some of the best dry Rosés.

According to Jeanne Howard of MC Weekly, Ian Brand is the winemaker and driving force behind seven boutique wineries in Monterey County and consults with four other labels. Yet it is his Le P’Tit Paysan Mourvèdre San Benito County Rosé Pierre’s Pirouette 2012 that got me pouring today.

California’s 2012 vintage continues to create a buzz and Brand’s dry French-style Rosé is one of the best I have tasted this season in a state that has produced a plethora of outstanding examples. And winemakers are creating some outstanding pinks with Cinsault, Tempranillo and Pinot Noir.

In fact, I find myself scouring wine shelves looking for that perfect balance between fresh fruit aromas and a dry, crisp, light, refreshing taste. I also want to keep most of my Rosé purchases around $20 or less.

The 2012 Le P’Tit Paysan Mourvèdre had hints of rhubarb, blood orange but the dry Rosé shone its salmon hue and minerality much like its French counterparts.
The 2012 Le P’Tit Paysan Mourvèdre had hints of rhubarb, blood orange but the dry Rosé shone its salmon hue and minerality much like its French counterparts.

Tim Fish agreed with Stan when he wrote of Brand’s San Benito County gem: “Who needs French Rosé when California can make them this good?” I agree with Fish when he wrote Brand’s Le P’tit Paysan Pierre’s Pirouette is a “winning blend of Mourvèdre and Grenache that tastes like a pink from the Southern Rhône.”

Wine Enthusiast named Brand a rising star among winemakers in the April 2013 issue. To me his Rosé is a star which tops a great year of pink wine in 2012.

In my glass, the 2012 Le P’Tit Paysan Mourvèdre Rosé showed a beautiful salmon hue that complimented the subdued strawberry and apricot aromas. I grew up in the Northwest and enjoyed a hint of rhubarb before the dry taste of watermelon took over. Finally, the finish lingered with blood orange. I appreciated how Brand kept the flavors in check, including a noticeable but lovely minerality. The wine is balanced, full and ends with a soft spice. I drank a full pour (maybe two) while sitting in the steps of the pool. Later, I finished the bottle with a plate of charcuterie. While his Rosés may improve with another year in the bottle, Brand’s Le P’Tit Paysan wine can be enjoyed immediately.

Brand believes his Rosé’s success comes because his vines have difficulty growing in the Spur Ranch Vineyard over the limestone seabed, white rocks and fossil shells. The struggle creates thicker skins and stronger flavors. The scraggly vineyard is not only tough grow in but to work with as well.

Ian Brand moved to Monterey County and works in San Benito County on purpose, seeking out untapped potential in the rocky, limestone, old seabeds and shale soils.
Ian Brand moved to Monterey County and works in San Benito County. He is seeking out untapped potential in the rocky, limestone, old seabeds and shale soils.

“I moved to Montery County and work in San Benito County on purpose,” Brand said. “I love working there, seeking out untapped potential in the rocky, limestone, old seabeds and shale soils. I believe the climate and soil is perfect for the vine’s growth on the south-facing Chalone Peak to ultimately produce my style of Rosé.”

The San Francisco Chronicle wine writer Jon Bonné says 2013 may finally have brought a perfect storm of rosé and it is the hottest thing in wine now. He calls rose a “serious enough wine to be crafted with care, made from grapes dedicated to that purpose.” I am excited to say that Brand’s 2012 Le P’Tit Paysan Mourvèdre Rosé made Bonné’s list of wines that won’t disappoint. Check out
Think pink – a bumper crop of rosé this year for more information.

For those who act quickly, you still might be able to purchase a few bottles of this Rosé gem. Only 85 cases were produced and are selling for around $19.

The 2012 Le P’Tit Paysan Mourvèdre Rosé can be purchased in select small wine shops. Two local spots are The Grape Tray and Nick’s Wine Corner. Both can take orders over the phone and/or through their websites.

Be sure to check out Brand’s posts on the Le P’tit Paysan Facebook for more information.

If this wine does not seem to fit your fancy, Wine Folly’s Madeline Puckette will help you get in the know why and what kind of Rosé is right for you.

For more information on Le P’Tit Paysan visit the website or call Ian Brand at the winery: 831.212.3660 or through email: info@LPPwines.com. He is also on Twitter: @ptit_paysan.

For those who missed my latest posts, check out Calistoga: Brannan’s Grill for lunch or Tuscan tasting: Castello di Amorosa 2012 Rosato.

Be sure to return check out my Twitter @TalesoftheCork and on my Instagram (talesofthecork) daily postings. I also would covet those who would suggest a wine, restaurant, chef or hotel to visit. Feel free to contact me through social media or via email at talesofthecork@gmail.com.

Tuscan tasting: Castello di Amorosa 2012 Rosato

This post is part II of Calistoga’s Tuscan medieval castle lures Napa visitors (VIDEO).

After an hour touring the castle and winery of Castello di Amorosa, I was fortunate to settle into the Il Passito Room to relax and wine taste. For the next hour, my wife and I tried 10 different wines and will offer our observations on half of them.

After tasting the Vermentino (see previous post), John, our host, suggested we begin with two more whites before moving on to their Rosato and six reds. While the 2011 Pinot Bianco and the 2011 Napa Valley Chardonnay were refreshing, I was most interested in the Castello di Amorosa reds this time round.

I will say though, the Pinot Bianco was dry and crisp with aromas and flavors of apple and grapefruit. It should age well over the next couple of years but is a light wine and probably overpriced at $25. (1561 cases) However, folks at the 2013 San Francisco International Wine Competition, June 2013, named it Best in Class. As of the date of publication, discounts are available. The 2011 Napa Valley Chardonnay earned a Silver Medal at the 2013 San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition. This is a food-friendly wine with apple, pear and light buttery overtones. ($28, 1,344 cases)

The 2012 Gioia Rosato, a 100% Sangiovese, touts bright strawberry and cranberry flavors with plum and red delicious apple aromas, perfect for picnics.
The 2012 Gioia Rosato, a 100% Sangiovese, touts bright strawberry and cranberry flavors with plum and red delicious apple aromas, perfect for picnics.

With the heat in California at near record levels, I began the “red” tasting with the 2012 Gioia Rosato di Sangiovese. This Italian-style Rosè is 100% Sangiovese and reflects its darker rosy-red hue. The bright strawberry and cranberry flavors become creamy in the finish while the plum and red delicious apple aromas fill the glass and perfect for picnics, charcuterie or sipping by the pool.

This hot weather wine could be served with salmon salad, but was a little too bright for my tastes. Yet I must say, while created in the new world, this Rosato has substance to it like old world wines with lingering minerality, finishing with hints of citrus and spice. A good mix and worth the risk. Priced a little high at $24, it could use another year in the bottle to mature. (2056 cases)

For more on my Castello di Amorosa wine tasting experience, return to TalesoftheCork.com for my upcoming post: Tuscan tasting: Castello di Amorosa Pinot Noir. Castello di Amorosa wines are only available at the castle or by mail order. They are not available in restaurants. To order Castello wine, visit their web site at CastellodiAmorosa.com or call 1.707.942.8200.

Location:
Castello di Amorosa is open seven days a week from 9:30 a.m.- 6 p.m., March-October and 9:30 a.m.- 5 p.m., November-February. The castle/winery is located 5 1/2 miles north of St. Helena and 2 miles south of Calistoga at 4045 N. St. Helena Highway, Calistoga, CA 94515. Phone numbers: Office (707) 967-6278; Reservations: (707) 967-6272.

If you missed it, check out Tuscany trip takes Calistoga detour: First stop Fanny’s B&B.

Be sure to return check out my Twitter @TalesoftheCork and on my Instagram (talesofthecork) daily postings. I also would covet those who would suggest a wine, restaurant, chef or hotel to visit. Feel free to contact me through social media or via email at talesofthecork@gmail.com.

Piccini Villa Cortile Riserva 2006 Brunello di Montalcino

This is my first installment of TalesoftheCork Wine Reviews.

Piccini Villa Cortile Riserva 2006 Brunello di Montalcino

With James Suckling and other wine critics calling the 2006 Brunello di Montalcino the best ever, I thought I’d begin my tasting review section with the darling of Italian red wine. As production increased over the last decade, it has become possible to purchase a wonderful bottle of Brunello without emptying the pocket book.

My first wine review will be the 2006 Piccini Villa Cortile Riserva DOCG Brunello di Montalcino. It is a dry red wine from Tuscany, Italy.

The romance of Italy is at your fingertips with this light Tuscan example of Brunello. Whether you travel to Tuscany this summer/fall or not, the 2006 Brunellos are showing their Tuscan flair. After five years in the bottle and now three on the shelf, this dark, reddish-brown, deep-garnet color has notes of black cherry and pretty roses aromas that fill the wine bowl as you swirl it.

The 2006 Piccini Villa Al Cortile Brunello Di Montalcino Riserva can be purchased via WineChateau.com or other Internet outlets.
The 2006 Piccini Villa Al Cortile Brunello Di Montalcino Riserva can be purchased via WineChateau.com or other Internet outlets.

This will be a great first Brunello for someone who’s experimenting with Italy’s most prized varietal. I opened the bottle three hours before dinner to give it time to breath and I wasn’t disappointed.

Brunello winemakers keep the wine in oak barrels for three years. The Piccini Sangiovese fruit is now showing a rich black cherry, mesquite with hints of coffee and chocolate aromas combined with a plum and brown sugar medium finish. The tannins have softened and dried fruits, spices including sage, cardamonm and clove, appear during a lasting finish at 14% alcohol.

While 2006 has wide fan fair, this is not a huge version but rather a lighter Brunello that even has some coffee overtones. I think it is perfect for roasts, game and mature cheese. On a rating scale of 100, I give the Piccini Villa Al Cortile Brunello 90 points.

Wine Enthusiast gave the Piccini Brunello 93 points.

The Piccini Brunello should continue to improve some but this light bodied Brunello is worth a try now. Originally marketed at $60 a bottle, this is the right time to purchase the 2006 Picciini Villa Cortile Riserva DOCG Brunello.

Currently this wine can be bought online through various outlets, including WineChateau.com for $34.97. If you are willing to buy a case of this or mix and match wine, the shipping is free! Another excellent source to find a good price for wine is at Wine-Searcher.com.

The average price for this wine currently is $37 (excluding tax) and available for as low as $34.97. Sample received courtesy Wine Chateau for review purposes.

According to their web flyer, the Piccini winery has been making wines since 1882. Winemaker Santo Gozzo grows his Sangiovese Grosso grapes on a seven hectare estate vineyards with a limestone based soil balancing clay and schist.

Be sure to return check out my Twitter @TalesoftheCork and on my Instagram (talesofthecork) daily postings. I also would covet those who would suggest a wine, restaurant, chef or hotel to visit. Feel free to contact me through social media or via email at talesofthecork.gmail.com.

If you missed it, check out my latest blog post: Talesofthecork to add grass roots wine reviews.